CVE-2022-21913 Local Security Authority (Domain Policy) Remote Protocol Security Feature Bypass.

CVE-2022-21913 Local Security Authority (Domain Policy) Remote Protocol Security Feature Bypass.

The Microsoft Windows operating system supports several security features, such as data encryption, data signing and data integrity, which can prevent an attacker from tampering with system data to cause damage. One important security feature that helps protect data on computers is the local security authority. The local security authority checks the integrity of all system data when it is loaded into memory and validates the source and composition of data to ensure that it has not been altered since it was last signed into memory. The local security authority is an integral part of the operating system’s security architecture and helps protect against many types of attacks. When a user logs on to a system, the local security authority checks the integrity of that user’s data and validates the user’s credentials. The local security authority is the only security authority on a Windows device and cannot be disabled or bypassed by an attacker. Remote Protocol Security Feature Bypass This issue is due to the fact that certain protocols that are used to establish secure connections between two systems do not conform to the requirements of the Windows remote protocol security feature. In particular, protocols that use Diffie-Hellman group exchange do not validate the certificate presented by the remote system. This allows an attacker to forge a remote certificate and impersonate a legitimate server, resulting in a remote protocol security feature bypass

CWE-326: Incorrect Implementation of Security Feature

This issue is due to the fact that certain protocols that are used to establish secure connections between two systems do not conform to the requirements of the Windows remote protocol security feature. In particular, protocols that use Diffie-Hellman group exchange do not validate the certificate presented by the remote system. This allows an attacker to forge a remote certificate and impersonate a legitimate server, resulting in a remote protocol security feature bypass

Summary of Request

A vulnerability in the remote protocol security feature of Microsoft Windows allows an attacker to forge a remote certificate and impersonate a legitimate server, resulting in a remote protocol security feature bypass. This can enable an attacker to obtain administrative privileges on the victim’s computer.

Supported Workstations and Servers

This vulnerability affects all supported workstations and servers with the following operating systems:
- Windows 7 32-bit
- Windows 7 64-bit
- Windows Server 2008 R2 64-bit
- Windows Server 2008 R2 32-bit
The vulnerability is exploited through a man in the middle attack. In particular, an attacker tricks a victim into connecting to a malicious server. The attacker then intercepts the connection request and sends back their own certificate that was not signed by Microsoft to the remote system. This allows them to impersonate the remote system and access confidential data on the victim’s system.

Technical Operations

Vulnerabilities in the Microsoft Windows operating system can allow an attacker to bypass some security features and gain unauthorized access to a system. This can be done by impersonating a legitimate server using forged certificates, enabling an attacker to conduct man-in-the-middle attacks on users or bypass certain security features. This article provides details of several vulnerabilities that affect Windows computers.

How do I find out if my Windows system is vulnerable?

If your Windows system is vulnerable to CVE-2022-21913, the local security authority will not be able to validate the remote certificate presented by the server. This will result in a remote protocol security feature bypass. You can find out if your Windows system is vulnerable by visiting https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/explore. If you are using Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer, you can also visit this website directly.

References

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