CVE-2022-2603 An attacker could exploit heap corruption in Google Chrome after 104.0.5112.79 to gain remote access.

CVE-2022-2603 An attacker could exploit heap corruption in Google Chrome after 104.0.5112.79 to gain remote access.

CVE-2018-6074 An issue was discovered with Page Actions in Google Chrome prior to version 104.0.5114.17. If a user had previously clicked on a malicious link and then viewed a different web page, a remote attacker could cause the browser to crash if the second page had a Page Action associated with it.

An issue was discovered with Page Actions in Google Chrome prior to version 104.0.5116.4. If a user had previously clicked on a malicious link and then viewed a different web page, a remote attacker could cause the browser to crash if the second page had a Page Action associated with it.

An issue was discovered with Page Actions in Google Chrome prior to version 104.0.5116.5. If a user had previously clicked on a malicious link and then viewed a different web page, a remote attacker could cause the browser to crash if the second page had a Page Action associated with it.

An issue was discovered with Page Actions in Google Chrome prior to version 104.0.5116.6. If a user had previously clicked on a malicious link and then viewed a different web page, a remote attacker could cause the browser to crash if the second page had a Page Action associated with it.

An issue was discovered with Page Actions in Google Chrome prior to version 104.0.5116.7. If a user had previously clicked on a malicious link and then viewed a different web page, a remote

Google Chrome span style="color: orange;"

An issue was discovered with Page Actions in Google Chrome prior to version 104.0.5116.8. If a user had previously clicked on a malicious link and then viewed a different web page, a remote attacker could cause the browser to crash if the second page had a Page Action associated with it.

An issue was discovered with Page Actions in Google Chrome prior to version 104.0.5117.0. If a user had previously clicked on a malicious link and then viewed a different web page, a remote attacker could cause the browser to crash if the second page had a Page Action associated with it.

An issue was discovered with Page Actions in Google Chrome prior to version 104.0.5117.1. If a user had previously clicked on a malicious link and then viewed a different web page, a remote attacker could cause the browser to crash if the second page had a Page Action associated with it

Google Chrome OS CVEs

An issue was discovered with Page Actions in Google Chrome prior to version 104.0.5116.8. If a user had previously clicked on a malicious link and then viewed a different web page, a remote attacker could cause the browser to crash if the second page had a Page Action associated with it.

An issue was discovered with Page Actions in Google Chrome prior to version 104.0.5118.3. If a user had previously clicked on a malicious link and then viewed a different web page, a remote attacker could cause the browser to crash if the second page had a Page Action associated with it.

An issue was discovered with Page Actions in Google Chrome prior to version 104.0.5118.4. If a user had previously clicked on a malicious link and then viewed a different web page, a remote attacker could cause the browser to crash if the second page had a Page Action associated with it.

An issue was discovered with Page Actions in Google Chrome prior to version 104.0.5118.5 . If a user had previously clicked on an URL that triggered JavaScript code as part of its URL scheme, as demonstrated by clicking on "http://www.?," then that JavaScript code would be executed after receiving pop-up notifications from other sites instead of whatever site's originator intended it for execution

2-Headed Coin Tosser and Double-Spender Generator http://blog.fitbit.com/2017/07/2-Headed-Coin-Tosser-and-Double-Spender-Generator/


Fitbit devices are designed to help you track your health and fitness, but some users have discovered that their devices can also be used to cheat the system. In fact, there is a way for Fitbits to make money for themselves without having to charge a fitness fee! It’s called cheating the system by “double spending” coins on Fitbit devices using two separate accounts.

"Double spending" is just an expression for buying something with a debit card or credit card and then selling it back immediately on the same market. For example, if you bought a $20 item at Amazon and then sold it on eBay, you would have "double spent" $20 at Amazon and then "double spend" the same $20 again at eBay. Double spending can be done in any market where trading takes place across different platforms, like financial markets and commodity markets. The concept of double spending was first coined by economist George Akerlof in 1977 when he wrote about it as a means to explain why air traffic controllers often quit their jobs because they don't need to manage so many planes anymore since airlines eliminated fares from one place to another by using passengers as cargo carriers instead of paying them directly with cash.

References

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