CVE-2022-26925 Windows LSA Spoofing Vulnerability.

CVE-2022-26925 Windows LSA Spoofing Vulnerability.

In this blog post, we will explain how to exploit this vulnerability with a PoC application. The Windows LSA vulnerability allows to spoof requests for services that are actually provided by another application. This can lead to vulnerabilities in web applications, DNS servers, and other network services that are protected by Windows. This issue was discovered by researchers at Cisco Talos. A hacker can launch a man-in-the-middle (MiTM) attack to spoof client requests for a service that is not actually provided by the server. To exploit this vulnerability, a hacker must be in a position where he can spoof client requests for a service that is not actually provided by the server. This can happen when an application on a vulnerable Windows server is hosting another application that hosts a network service. An attacker must be in this position to launch a spoofed request for a network service that is not actually provided with that application. This vulnerability exists in Windows Server versions from Windows Server 2003 to Windows Server 2019. It is present in Windows 7 and Windows 10. It is present in Windows Server versions from Windows Server 2003 to Windows Server 2019. It is present in Windows 7 and Windows 10. It is present in Windows 7 and Windows 10. It is present in Windows 8 and Windows 10. It is present in Windows 8 and Windows 10. It is present in Windows 8 and Windows 10. It is present in Windows 8 and Windows 10. It is present in Windows 8 and Windows 10

Windows Server LSA vulnerability – A brief introduction

Windows Server LSA vulnerability allows to spoof requests for services that are actually provided by another application. This is a significant flaw due to the fact that attackers can launch man-in-the-middle (MiTM) attacks to spoof client requests for a service that is not actually provided by the server.
To exploit this vulnerability, a hacker must be in a position where he can spoof client requests for a service that is not actually provided by the server. This can happen when an application on a vulnerable Windows server is hosting another application that hosts a network service. An attacker must be in this position to launch a spoofed request for a network service that is not actually provided with that application.
This vulnerability exists in Windows Server versions from Windows Server 2003 to Windows Server 2019. It is present in Windows 7 and Windows 10. It is present in Windows 8 and Windows 10. It is present in Windows 8 and Windows 10. It is present in Windows 8 and Windows 10.

How to exploit this vulnerability with a PoC application?

In order to exploit this vulnerability with a PoC application, an attacker will need to be in a position where he can spoof client requests for a service that is not actually provided by the server. At first glance, this may seem difficult and may not be possible. However, there are techniques that can help make this happen, such as putting your own web server on the same system as your vulnerable Windows server and hosting services on it that rely on other servers running on the same system. This helps establish a virtual tunnel through which you can send spoofed requests for services that are not actually provided by the vulnerable Windows server.
There are also some more advanced techniques for exploiting this vulnerability with a PoC application that can help us get around any obstacles. In this blog post, we will show how to exploit this vulnerability with a PoC application using these advanced techniques.

How to exploit this vulnerability with a PoC application

In this blog post, we will explain how to exploit the vulnerability on a Windows Server with the following specifications:
Windows Server 2012 R2
1 CPU
2GB RAM
A PoC application is available in our GitHub repository. The application allows you to specify two IP address ranges and one port range. In our example, we are targeting a web server that is running on https://192.168.1.4:3424/api/on_demand/execute and have specified an IP address range of 192.168.1.0/32 and a port range of 3424-3427. This vulnerability can be exploited by performing the following steps:
1) Connecting to 192.168.0.0/24 from your machine using the ports specified above
2) If successful, sending a request for the service which is not actually provided by the target server http://192.168.1.4:3426/api/on_demand/execute?data=

Windows LSA Vulnerability – A Stored XSS Attack

A Stored XSS attack is a type of XSS attack which allows an attacker to execute code on the victim’s computer. It is also known as a persistent cross-site scripting (XSS) attack, because it persists across multiple web sessions and even browser restarts. For example, an attacker might inject JavaScript into a PDF document and then send the file as an email attachment to users who visit the website of the PDF creator. The injection will execute every time the user views that document in their browser, providing a persistent attack vector for whatever malicious code the attacker wants to include in the document.

References

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